Last Updated: April 5, 2024. Report error / Make suggestion

Reducing Legal Financial Obligations

If you were convicted of a crime in Washington, you may be eligible for relief from some or all of the legal financial obligations (LFOs) attached to your case(s). The amount of relief you may be eligible for depends on the type of conviction, the types of LFOs assessed, and your financial resources.

If you have LFOs in a Superior Court case, you can use the Living with Conviction App to help walk you through the process of filling out the correct forms in order to request relief. 

If you have LFOs in a District or Municipal Court case, you can visit Washington LawHelp for more information on how to navigate the process in those courts.


If you need help determining which of your convictions have LFOs remaining to be paid, we can provide you with a free copy of your criminal history. Please fill out this request form and we will send you a copy of your criminal history report.

Legal Financial Obligation (LFO) Relief Presentation

The information covered –

  • Introduction
  • What are LFOs?
  • Available Relief
  • Changes from HB 1412
  • GR 39 Forms Walkthrough
  • Q & A

filing your own petition for legal financial obligation (lfo) relief

If you are able to prepare your own petition for LFO relief, you will also need to file it with the court and serve it on the prosecutor’s office. Living With Conviction has created these videos with instructions on filing and serving LFO motions for King, Snohomish, and Pierce counties.

King County Superior Court

Snohomish County Superior Court

Pierce County Superior Court

More Legal Support Guides

Reducing Legal Financial Obligations

If you were convicted of a crime in Washington, you may be eligible for relief from some or all of the legal financial obligations (LFOs) attached to your case(s). The amount of relief you may be eligible for depends on the type of conviction, the types of LFOs assessed, and your financial resources.

Guide to Determining Blake Eligibility

The Washington State Supreme Court’s ruling in the case State v. Blake found that the law criminalizing drug possession, RCW 69.50.4013, was unconstitutional. As a result of this ruling, any prior conviction under this law, and certain other related law, can be removed from your criminal record.

Vacating a Misdemeanor Conviction

Washington law allows for certain misdemeanor convictions to be vacated if specific criteria are met. This means that the conviction will be treated as if it never occurred.

Vacating a Felony Conviction

Washington law allows for certain felony convictions to be vacated if specific criteria are met. This means that the conviction will be treated as if it never occurred.

Legal Financial Obligations (LFOs) FAQ

Legal financial obligations (LFOs) are debts related to a criminal conviction, including fines, costs and fees and restitution imposed by the court as part of a criminal sentence.

Warrants FAQ

Learn what warrants are, how they impact you, and one happens if you have one.